Take the First Step.

Whether you have questions about the Duke Diet and Fitness Center or are ready to take the next step into lifelong wellness, we’d love to hear from you. Call us at 800-235-3853 or fill out the below form. One of our team members will be in touch with you shortly to answer your questions or get you started. 
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

We take privacy very seriously. We will not sell or distribute your personal information.

More is Not Always Better and other Fitness Myths

For many, strength training is the best and favorite form of exercise - full stop! When done correctly, the many vast benefits greatly outweigh the scarce risk. Due to this, many people will erroneously think that more days of lifting will be better than less.  However, two recent papers published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research in 2018 showed us that more is not always better.

By Jared Rosenberg, Exercise Physiologist, Duke Diet and Fitness Center

Researchers divided the participants into two groups:

Group 1: Strength-trained three days a week.

Group 2: Strength-trained six days a week. 

What is remarkable is that both groups had similar improvements in strength and muscle growth (hypertrophy). Each group had the same amount of training volume per week, meaning both groups did the same amount of work per week. 

Essentially, the group that lifted six days a week did half as much on one day as the three-day group, but because they lifted twice as many days, the volume load was the same for both groups. 

How to calculate Volume Load: (load) X (repetitions) X (sets).

Take the First Step

What does this Mean for You?

Overall Volume Load per Week is More Important for Muscular Strength and size

These two research teams highlight the fact that the overall volume load per week is more important for muscular strength and hypertrophy than overall days you lift. When coming up with a weekly strength routine, you should meet with a qualified exercise physiologist who can properly determine the correct amount of volume load per week you should be lifting along with over how many days to spread it out. 

Remember Form is King

While these two papers are certainly substantial, we cannot draw a hundred percent conclusions just yet. Hopefully, more research will come out to shed information on this to further help us make the correct decisions. In the meantime, remember, form is king. Lifting with improper form is not beneficial in any way and very counterproductive. It is not what you do, but how you do it!

This is why, here at the Duke Diet and Fitness Center, we stress proper form. Hard work is not synonymous with smart work and we are here to make sure you progress in a safe and effective way

Take the First Step


Colquhoun, RJ, Gai, CM, Aguilar, D, Bove, D, Dolan, J, Vargas, A, et al. Training volume, not frequency, indicative of maximal strength adaptations to resistance training. J Strength Cond Res 32: 1207–1213, 2018.

Saric, J, Lisicia, D, Orlic, I, Gregic, J, Krieger, JW, Vuk, S, Schonfeild, BJ. RESISTANCE TRAINING FREQUENCIES OF 3 AND 6 TIMES PER WEEK PRODUCE SIMILAR MUSCULAR ADAPTATIONS IN RESISTANCE-TRAINED MEN. J Strength Cond Res 00: 1-8, 2018.

Want updates about our blog & specials?

Join Our Mailing List

With more than 40-year years of experience in delivering wellness and weight loss programs, the Duke Diet and Fitness Center has established itself as one of the leading weight loss and total body health destinations for health conscious individuals seeking a residential style health program focused on natural weight loss.

Close X
Close X